Thanksgiving Wine

This will be the first year I’m not cooking for Thanksgiving dinner in a long time. Not cooking  a thing. I could probably do mashed potatoes in the hotel coffee maker, but I’ll leave that to the experts. So instead, I’m bringing the wine.

My selection so far — there are eight people attending:

  • 1 unoaked chardonnay (OR)
  • 2 sparklings (New Mexico, yes New Mexico)
  • 2 pinot noirs (OR)
  • 1 dessert semillon (OR)

The plan is to road-trip to Eureka California, about 400 miles South of Portland. Eureka at one time had a bit of a food scene, fresh seafood, not too far from California wine country and a good amount of tourism and some creative cheap eateries for the students. From what I understand the recession hit Eureka especially hard. I’m curious to see what’s there now.

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Wineries and Petting Zoos: Wine Tasting Tips

Thanksgiving is the busiest tasting time for Oregon wineries. For those planning to do some wine tasting this weekend, I have a few tips.

  1. Avoid any wineries with a petting zoo, the world’s largest wine barrel or an aerial tram.
  2. Wineries with a family dog or cat is a plus, even the occasional goat or horse is okay and do not apply to rule #1, petting zoo clause.
  3. Do not stop on your way to the winery to get coffee, no matter how cool you think Dutch Bros is.
  4. Pick friends to go with that are wine club members at different wineries than you are.
  5. If you see a large van of wine drinkers, make sure you beat them to the tasting room.
  6. If you see a large van  of wine drinkers having a bachelorette party. Stick around, cause it could be amusing, but don’t expect a tranquil wine sipping experience.
  7. Do not go up to total strangers asking  “Are my teeth purple?”
  8. Be suspect of wineries with a cute animal on the label.
  9. The longer the tasting notes, the more I think the winemaker is trying to hide something.

 If you want to know all about proper wine tasting ettiquette, check out Tasting-Wine.com